Australia is home to four species of quolls, which are the largest carnivorous marsupials on mainland Australia. Information about these wonderful creatures is provided following.

Please contact the Australian Quoll Conservancy should you require further information on Network, Rescue and Research.

QUOLL FACTS | QUOLL PHOTOS

SPOTTED TAILED QUOLL

Description – Rufous or dark brown fur with white spots on body and tail. Adult males can be almost twice as large as females. Adults length (head to tail) 70cm to 1.2m, weight 1kg – 4kg
Habitat – Rainforest, wet and dry sclerophyll forest, coastal heath and alpine areas near fresh water. 
Eats – Generalist predator - Small to medium sized mammals, reptiles, birds, insects and carrion Population and distribution – North Queensland less than 400, NSW, SE QLD, VIC and TAS, less than 10,000.
Threats – Habitat Clearance, competition with and predation by introduced species, cane toads, road kill, accidental poisoning, disease.
Behaviour – Solitary, partly nocturnal, largely terrestrial but can be arboreal, dens in tree hollows, breeds in winter with up to 6 young able to attach to teats.
Life Span – 3 years in the wild, with only two years breeding cycle.

NORTHERN QUOLL

Description – Brown fur with white spots on body but absence on tail which is furry and often dark. Adult males usually slightly larger than females. Adults length (head to tail) 40cm to 65cm, weight 300g – 1kg
Habitat – Dry Rainforest, eucalypt woodlands, savannah, rock piles and boulders, agricultural areas, human settlements. Usually always near fresh water.
Eats – Omnivore and Generalist Predator - Small sized mammals, reptiles, birds, insects, carrion, fruit and seeds.
Population and distribution – Fragmented populations across Northern Australia. Large scale decline in population and distribution continuing as the cane toad advances across northern Australia. Population unknown across the country. Less than 10,000 in far north Qld. This population is largely stable and seemingly no longer affected by cane toads. See example here click on tab VIDEOS
Threats – Habitat Clearance, competition with and predation by introduced species, cane toads, road kill, accidental poisoning, disease
Behaviour – Solitary, partly nocturnal, largely terrestrial but also highly arboreal, dens in tree hollows, very agile and fast. Can carry up to 8 young in pouch.
Life Span - Most males die after first mating season. Females usually live 2 years

EASTERN QUOLL

Description – Fawn Rufous or black fur with white spots on body, no spots on tail. Adults length (head to tail) 45cm to 70cmm, weight 0.7kg – 2kg
Habitat – Open forest, scrubland, heath, grassy areas and agricultural areas.
Eats – Feeds largely on insects but also eats fruit, small mammals, lizards and carrion.
Population and distribution – Eastern and northern Tasmania. Population undergoing significant decline. Numbers in the low thousands. Extinct in former range on mainland in south and east. Last mainland sighting was in Neilson Park in Eastern Sydney in the 1960s.
Threats –
Habitat Clearance, introduced predators/competitors and road kill.
Behaviour –
Solitary, nocturnal, terrestrial Life Span – up to 3 years in the wild.

WESTERN QUOLL / CHUDITCH

Description – Rufous grey fur with white spots on body, none on tail. Adults length (head to tail) 50cm to 70cmm, weight 1kg – 2kg Habitat – Wet and dry sclerophyll forests, woodlands and mallee. Formerly also lived in arid areas
Eats – Generalist predator - Small vertebrates, freshwater crayfish, large arthropods and carrion. Population and distribution – Lived across 80% of Australia throughout the arid interior until population crashed. Now found only in south western WA. Population stable at about 6,000. Threats – Habitat Clearance, competition with and predation by introduced species, road kill.
Behaviour – Solitary, partly nocturnal, largely terrestrial but can be arboreal, dens in tree hollows. Life Span – up to 3 years in the wild


Documentary

A marsupial native cat has stalked the mountain tops of its northern domain for thousands of years.
In the lush tropical rainforests of northern Queensland, the largest surviving marsupial carnivore on mainland Australia has remained isolated and hidden from sight… until now!
The life and habits of this elusive northern subspecies of the spotted-tailed quoll are finally revealed.
Embark on a journey into the personal life of this endangered and long-lost cousin of the Tasmanian tiger. Be immersed in up-close and vivid experiences with this stealthy predator of the mountain forests.

DOCUMENTARY DISTRIBUTOR LINK

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